Blog Post #355:  Look who took a candid picture!!!

Blog Post #355:  Look who took a candid picture!!!

Taken from: http://money.cnn.com/2018/03/30/technology/google-clips-photography/index.htmlhttp://money.cnn.com/2018/03/30/technology/google-clips-photography/index.html

Okay, here is a concept – a camera placed on a table or someplace and it captures candid pictures.  It might take a lot of pictures, or just a few, but the ones it considered “candid” and “random” will make it onto storage.  

The author of the article doesn’t have pets (cat – or maybe playful kittens; dogs – or cute puppies); but does have children – so there is a great candid opportunity for taking the kids being kids.

While maybe not quite perfect in selecting the candid pictures, the author wrote this:

“The new $249 gadget, released in February, automates much of the job of a certain kind of photographer. You place the 2-inch high white square on a surface, preferably someplace frequented by children or pets. It automatically captures any “candid” scenes it determines are worthwhile with its wide-angle lens.”

“I spent a week with the camera, planting it on countertops, floors and shelves. Unfortunately my cat and bunny both passed away last year, so Clips only had children to work with. Luckily, my children are extremely good looking.”

“Even so, the resulting photos and videos had a common, soulless look to them. The wide-angle meant they were busy, with too much in focus and no appealing composition.”

“Essentially, Clips combines the hands-off approach of a surveillance camera with the visual style of a surveillance camera.”

Well, not quite a ringing endorsement – “soulless look to” the picture; the ‘hands-off approach of a surveillance camera with the visual style of a surveillance camera”.   But, if you are looking for the true random picture – this might just work for you.

The article also states:

“The software looks for children, animals, and faces, preferably within three-to-eight feet of the lens. Clips likes movement, but tries to avoid blurry photos and can tell when something is blocking the lens, like the hand of a curious child. It learns the faces of the people you save the most and takes more pictures of them. It is programmed to have a preference for happy, smiling faces.”

I was trying to think of places and times a camera like this might be nice.  I was at a wedding last weekend – and sure the photographers were trying to get good candid pictures.  Maybe a camera on top of DJ’s stand might be a good place to get candid pictures from the dance floor.

When we visit our daughter’s house, the girls run to “Papa”.  A camera in the right place might capture that random, candid moment.  

What do you think??

 

Bruce

Posted by Bruce White

Leave a Reply